Ambassadors

Harold Matthew
Shane Phillips
Joe Coyte
Tom Calma AO
Charlie King
Charlie Maher
Kurt Fearnley AOM
Jason Timor
Kyle Vander Kuyp
Adrian Dodson-Shaw
Mick Dodson
Pat Dodson
Patrick Johnson
John Leha
Raymond Ingram
Steve Moneghetti OAM
Steve Biddulph AM

Harold Matthew

This proud Torres Strait Island man was IMP’s first male athlete from Thursday Island. Harold Matthew is a husband, proud father of two young daughters, and a 2014 IMP Graduate. Since completing the New York City Marathon in 2014, Harold also completed the Honolulu Marathon in 2015 and in 2017 he became the first Indigenous Australian to finish the London Marathon. Harold has made a significant impact on Thursday Island, establishing the Thursday Island Deadly Runners group with fellow 2014 IMP Graduate and Thursday Island local, Elsie Seriat. TI Deadly Runners has started a running revolution on the island and in 2015 the first ever running festival was held on TI – the TI Running Festival (TIRF) – which attracted approximately 200 locals. Prior to Harold and Elsie’s involvement with IMP, no-one on TI ran; football was the sport of choice. Now, it’s a running island with many locals inspired to participate in races of all distances from 5km right through to marathons.

 

Shane Phillips

Shane is the Chairman and CEO of the Tribal Warrior Association, a non-profit organisation directed by Aboriginal people with Aboriginal Elders that offers training for employment and everyday assistance relief for struggling families. Shane is considered a well-respected member of the Redfern Aboriginal Community.

Joe Coyte

Joe is currently employed as the CEO at The Glen Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Centre. Joe is also a board member of NADA (Network of Alcohol and other Drugs Agencies). He has a background in finance and counselling and has worked in and around Aboriginal Residential Rehabilitation centres for over 10 years. Joe is a strong advocate of good governance as evidenced by his close and collegiate relationship with the board of the Ngaimpe Aboriginal. He is the current chairperson of Gosford/Narara Neighbourhood Centre which runs financial counselling, no interest loans, breakfast at primary schools and emergency relief programs amongst other things on the Central Coast. Personally Joe is a loving husband and devoted father of three children 12, 9 and 6. He considers fatherhood is most important role. Joe's strong family values are reflected in his future plans for The Glen, where he would like to see a greater role for family members, where clients consent, in the rehabilitation of their loved ones.

Tom Calma AO

Professor Calma is an Australian Aboriginal elder of the Kungarakan people and member of the Iwaidja tribe. He is a human rights and social justice campaigner, the sixth Chancellor of the University of Canberra, a post held since January 2014, and the first Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander man to hold the position of Chancellor of any Australian university.

Charlie King

Charlie is a Gurindji man and an Australian sports commentator who, in 2008, became the first Indigenous commentator to commentate at an Olympics. In 2015 he was awarded an Order of Australia Medal for his service to broadcast media and the indigenous community.

He is passionate about the role men play in being strong leaders and role models to younger generations and is a strong campaigner for no violence against women through his role with the campaign, No More.

Charlie Maher

Charlie is a father of two and lives with his wife, Talitha, in Dubbo.  Charlie is Australia’s first Indigenous Australian to run in the New York City Marathon as part of the inaugural Indigenous Marathon Project squad in 2010. He has since become an inspirational role model to his family, communities and 42 other IMP Graduates who have completed a major international marathon.  Charlie relocated from Alice Springs to Dubbo in 2014 to accept the role as a Director of Dubbo South Clontarf Academy.

Kurt Fearnley AOM

Kurt is a father of son, Harry, and lives in Newcastle with wife, Sheridan.  He is a seven-time world champion and three-time Paralympic gold medallist who has won marathons around the world including New York, London and Chicago multiple times. His contribution to the sporting industry and his tenacious, fighting spirit earned him Commonwealth Athlete of the Year with a Disability and the 2009 NSW Young Australian of the Year.

Jason Timor

Jason is a father of three sons, and lives in Sydney with his wife.  Jason is a Badu Island man from the Torres Straits and was raised in Mackay Queensland before studying Communications at the Central Queensland University in Rockhampton. After extensive experience delivering on large recruitment strategies for diverse clients such as Arnotts, KPMG, AMP, Sydney Water, Railcorp, Westfield, AGL and Integral Energy, he joined Qantas in 2010.

Jason was appointed to Qantas with the primary focus to design and implement an Indigenous recruitment, engagement and retention strategy across the Qantas Group including an internal mentoring model called MALU.

Jason now holds the positon of Manager of Indigenous Partnerships and Reconciliation developing the Indigenous strategy through multiple-functions including brand/marketing, supplier diversity, cultural competency and Reconciliation leadership.

Kyle Vander Kuyp

Kyle is a father of one daughter and lives in Melbourne with partner, Rheannan.  He is an indigenous Australian athlete of the Worimi and Yuin tribe of North and South Coast New South Wales. Kyle is the Australian record holder for the 110 metres hurdles, clocking a time of 13.29 seconds at the 1995 World Championships in Athletics. In addition he has competed at the 1996 and 2000 Olympic Games, as well as the 1994, 1998 and 2006 Commonwealth Games.

Kyle was the recipient of the Charles Perkins award in 2003 and appointed to the Board of the Australian Sports Commission in 2008.

Adrian Dodson-Shaw

Adrian is a father of two boys, with another on the way, and lives in Broome WA with his partner, Yona McKay. He is a 2014 IMP Graduate who, in 2015, went on to became the first Indigenous Australian to travel to the North Pole and also run one of the world’s most gruelling events – the North Pole Marathon. Adrian’s character is synonymous with strength, resilience and determination.  He demonstrates incredible leadership qualities and has become another inspirational role model to people across the country.

Mick Dodson

Mick is a father of three and member of the Yawru people and one of Australia’s most distinguished Indigenous leaders.  He is an Indigenous Australian barrister, academic, and member of the Yawuru peoples in the Broome area of the southern Kimberley region of Western Australia.

Mick graduated with degrees in Jurisprudence and Law from Monash University in 1974, as the first Indigenous person to graduate from law in Australia. He went on to work as a criminal solicitor for the Victorian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service, and later as a criminal defence barrister at the Victorian Bar, where he still practices as a barrister specialising in native title. He has worked extensively as a legal adviser in native title and human rights, and as an academic in Indigenous law. Mick is currently Professor of Law at the Australian National University, as the director of its National Centre for Indigenous Studies, and has lectured as a visiting academic at the University of Arizona and Harvard University respectively.

Pat Dodson

Brother of Mick Dodson, Pat is a father of two, lives in Broome and has devoted his life to reconciliation between Indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.  One of the most respected Indigenous leaders, he was the first ordained Aboriginal Catholic Priest and founding Chairman of the Council for Reconciliation, earning him the recognition as the ‘Father of Australian Reconciliation’.

Patrick Johnson

Patrick lives in Darwin and is the current Oceanian and Australian record holder for the 100 metres, clocking a time of 9.93 seconds in the Mito International, Japan 2003 making him the 17th fastest man in history. Patrick competed in the 2002 Commonwealth Games receiving a bronze medal in the 4x100 metre relay, 2006 Commonwealth Games making the finals in the 100 and 200 metres, 2005 World Championships finishing 6th in the 200m and 2000 Sydney Olympic Games.   

John Leha

John is a 29 year old man from the Aboriginal Wakka Wakka tribe and currently lives in Marrickville, Sydney. He is a member of the Indigenous Marathon Project 2015 squad and is a role model to many young nieces and nephews.

John is determined to be a leader in his community to inspire change to address issues of obesity, diabetes and heart disease, and increase physical activity, promote the benefits of living a healthy and positive lifestyle. John has a strong background in Indigenous leadership and currently works full time at the Department of Social Services.

Raymond Ingram

Ray is a Graduate of the Indigenous Marathon Project’s 2014 squad. Through his involvement in IMP, Ray applied for a position with Thiess and after a lengthy application process was selected from more than 200 applicants to work as an XP Tunneller on the new Western Sydney Train Line.

Raymond has competed at a high level in amateur boxing in Australia, winning State and National titles.  He wanted to be involved in IMP for the opportunity, the challenge, and most importantly the ability to promote health for other Indigenous Australians. He wants to show others you can do anything once you put your mind to it. Ray is a proud uncle, role model and mentor to two nieces and he is proud to be an ambassador for the inaugural IMF Father’s Day WARRIOR Run.

 

Steve Moneghetti (OAM)

Steve is a father of four and lives in Melbourne with wife, Tanya, where he continues to be a strong community contributor in his home town of Ballarat.  He is one of Australia’s great long-distance runners, has medalled for Australia at numerous Commonwealth Games and also represented Australia at four Olympic Games finishing in the top 10 in three of those games. Other International meets include six World Athletics Championships winning bronze in 1997, winning the Berlin Marathon in 1990 and also taking out the Tokyo Marathon 1994 and the Great North Run. Steve has also won four Sydney City 2 Surf races.

Away from running Steve has a degree in civil engineering, a graduate diploma in education and an honorary doctorate. He is a personal development consultant with the Ministry of Education and chair of the Victorian Review into Physical and Sport Education in Schools.

Steve has also named at the Chef de Mission for the Australian 2010 Commonwealth Games that were held in Deli, India. In 2014 Steve was nominated for an Order of Australia medal.

Steve Biddulph AM

Steve was a family psychologist for 30 years and campaigned all over the world for more understanding of boys and men.  His books which include Raising Boys, Manhood, Raising Girls, and The Secret of Happy Children are in 3 million homes and 32 languages.  Steve was voted Australian Father of the Year for his work encouraging the role of dads, and he still tours worldwide teaching and talking to mums and dads.  

He lives in the Tamar Valley, Tasmania among a large extended family.